mom with newborn

A New Mom’s Guide To Self-Care After Giving Birth

Giving birth can be difficult enough as it is — worrying about if you’ll be able to get the time off you need to care for your new family, or if you’ll have to hire a few LA wrongful termination attorneys in the event that your place of employment tries something underhanded. Assuming all that goes well, though, you’ve also got to consider how you’re going to take care of yourself and your child after giving birth. There are several important aspects of your health to take into consideration, and these are a few of the most critical.

Get Plenty of Rest

The importance of sleep for new mothers can’t be overstated. There’s a lot of work that goes into caring for a freshly born child, and if you’re trying to do it off of no sleep, you’re going to have a hard time keeping up. The problem, however, is that babies are notorious for waking up at the least opportune moments, robbing you of those precious eight hours.

To compensate, you might want to consider taking naps whenever you can throughout the day. If your baby is sleeping, then it’s time for you to sleep as well to avoid overexertion. While it might not be the solid block of sleep you are used to, those naps will add up and help sustain you through the postpartum period.

Watch Your Diet

Diet and nutrition is important for everyone, but new moms in particular need to watch what they eat. For those who are breastfeeding, experts recommend that you add a little something extra to compensate. This means consuming an additional 300 calories per day along with an extra 25 grams of protein to aid your recovery.

Not all foods are created equal, however. There are plenty of foods to avoid because of their poor nutritional content, and a few postpartum superfoods you’ll want to prioritize in your diet, like salmon, blueberries, brown rice, eggs, and leafy greens.

Have a Support Network

Going it alone is a surefire way to get overwhelmed, especially if this is your first child and you haven’t really settled into the rhythm of being a parent. 

You and your partner (if you have one) will need to learn how to share responsibilities in order to make a smooth transition into life with a newborn. What’s more, you might want to consider calling upon your extended support network — friends, family, paid homecare providers, etc. — to pick up some of the slack and help care for your new child.